ISSN E 2409-2770
ISSN P 2521-2419

Partial Replacement of Cement by Industrial Fly ash as Binding Agent



Vol. 6, Issue 12, PP. 543-546, December 2019

DOI

Keywords: Fly Ash, Incubation Time, Tensile Strength, Compressive Strength

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Concrete is the key component that is usually used in construction as in the world containing 70-75 percent of natural rocks, sand and 10-15 percent of Portland cement. Concerns about global sustainability of construction technology and the efficient use of structural aggregates in concrete will help minimize construction problems. Because of the high cost of cement, construction has become more costly and due to CO2 pollution and other harmful heavy metals during the cement production process, it becomes environmentally dangerous, so we can partly replace the portend cement with fly ash created as solid waste by different industries and power generation plants. At dumping sites, this fly ash is dumped locally, causing air pollution. Because of its binding behavior, we use fly ash as a binding constituent. The purpose behind this research work was to evaluate the tensile and compressive strength of specimens while using different fly ashes in favor of environmentally friendly technique and to perform the properties of workout strength and the variation pattern with mixing in different proportions of different tests such as tensile and compressive strength after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of healing. Cement was replaced by various types of ashes including coal ash, Vachellia nilotica (Kikar) ash, Dalbergia sisso (shisham) with different concentration of 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 % of each. Results showed that when 10% of coal ash, Vachellia nilotica (kikar) ash, Dalbergia sisso (shisham) was used, concrete and mortar tensile and compressive strength increased with the increase in healing time. While the decrease in intensity was observed in samples with proportions of 20, 30, 40 and 50% with the same healing time. In addition the samples with coal, Vachellia nilotica (Kikar) ash, Dalbergia sissoo (shisham) ash, a decreasing trend in strength along with weight decrease was observed. By using coal ash upto 10% can reduce the 13.5% construction cost without losing strength properties in concrete. Such building materials can be used in lightweight buildings such as farm buildings for poultry and dairy farm buildings.


Muhammad Moeen: College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, China, School of Civil Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, China, Institute of Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, 38000, Pakistan.

Qi Tian: College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, China, School of Civil Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, China.

Muhammad Yaseen: Institute of Soil and Environmental Sciences, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, 38000, Pakistan.

Abdul Nasir: Department of Structure and Environmental Engineering, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, 38000, Pakistan.

Zawar Hussain: College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, China.

Mudassir Habib: College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, China.


Muhammad Moeen Qi Tian Muhammad Yaseen Abdul Nasir Zawar Hussain and Mudassir Habib Partial Replacement of Cement by Industrial Fly ash as Binding Agent International Journal of Engineering Works Vol. 6 Issue 12 PP. 543-546 December 2019


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