ISSN E 2409-2770
ISSN P 2521-2419

Production of Liquid and Solid Fuel by the Technique of Microwave Pyrolysis of Scrap Tires and its Analysis



Vol. 6, Issue 06, PP. 202-207, June 2019

DOI

Keywords: Pyrolysis, Microwave Heating, Pyrolytic Oil, Biomass, Renewable Energy, waste Tires. Rubber.

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The discussion in this paper is about the possible use of microwave pyrolysis technique as an energy-capable alternative to present heating techniques in biomass waste processing and treatment for renewable energy system. The wreck tires have relevant disposal or recycling issues under environment and financial and sustainable modes. These techniques can be a challenging for manufacturing and intellectual learning researches. In this competition, pyrolysis is a latest, strong substitute to the reprocessing of useless tires, until unless it will be possible to produce value adding results. In any case, upgrades in warmth exchange innovation are fundamental to enhance the plenitude of the procedure. Here we are describing the usage of microwave radiation (MW) as one of the most beneficial heating skills for pyrolysis. Whereas, there are different techniques for the process of the waste tires in previous era, such as crushing to get crumbs and rubber powder, burning them in cement furnaces for thermal power generation, re-stepping, decomposition by chemicals Heat degradation of rubber materials. The important and valuable chemicals in commercial use are derived from oils which are obtained from pyrolysis process by subjecting the pyrolytic oils to a fraction distillation at a temperature of about 207 ° C (under atmospheric) pressure for the product of at least one commercially valuable Chemical to isolate at least one commercially valuable chemical. Some of the selected chemicals from the group, consisting of paraffin, naphenes, olefins and flavorings. Particularly valuable chemicals that can be extracted from ripe pyrolytic oils are benzene, toluene, xylene, styrene and lime dl. The distillation fraction, which boils above 204 ° C, can be used as an extension oil in the production of various rubber and plastic parts. An improved process for producing the carbon black by microwave pyrolysis (MWP) of used rubber tires is also revealed. The recovered products which have high commercial value indicates advantage over traditional, more destructive disposal methods, and it also advice the  very great capability for measuring the process and feedback to the commercial as well as industrial level.


  1. Kaleemullah: Key Laboratory of Energy Thermal Conversion and Control of Ministry of Education, School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing, China Nanjing, China.

  2. Ben Haoxi: Key Laboratory of Energy Thermal Conversion and Control of Ministry of Education, School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing, China Nanjing, China.

  3. Zhihong Wu: Key Laboratory of Energy Thermal Conversion and Control of Ministry of Education, School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing, China Nanjing, China.


Kaleemullah Ben Haoxi and Zhihong Production of Liquid and Solid Fuel by the Technique of Microwave Pyrolysis of Scrap Tires and it International Journal of Engineering Works Vol. 6 Issue 06 PP. 202-207 June 2019


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